Tide, rocks and weed.

Foiling related talk in here
ronnie
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Tide, rocks and weed.

Post by ronnie »

Foiling requires knowing what is under the water - if you live somewhere with uneven rocky shoreline with lots of boulders and some weed. Most of my coast is cross-off for the prevailing wind. There is a large inlet, which provides an onshore direction - but part of it is very tide dependant, and access is limited.

Tides vary - in my area from maybe 2.8m high tide to 3.6m high tide, with low tide down to 0.2m - so a tidal range of up to 3.4m.
I found that my best plan was to take a picture at half tide (when the tide is always 1.9m) - because half tide is always the same for every tide. Then I can get an idea from the height of a particular high tide, what depth of water there is above where that half tide covered (eg. up to 1.7m max.).

If I'm going to foil in shallow water, I have to get an idea as the tide comes in of any high spots to avoid above the half tide level.
eg, if high tide is 2.8m and my foil depth is 80cm, then 2.8m-1.9m=the depth of water above mid tide=90cm, so anything 10cm above mid tide can hit the foil.
If it is a 3.6m tide, then 1.7m-80=90cm which is how high something as to be above mid tide to hit the foil.

I find that if I tie on a small float to indicate a hazard, members of the public tend to cut the rope and steal the float.

Weed.
Tends to be attached to rocks, so if the bottom has rocks, I might also have to consider the weed in addition to the height of a rock.
There are other long stringy weeds, which can reach maybe 8 to 10 feet from the bottom and tend to be anchored below low tide level. Checking out an area near low tide on a paddle board or sometimes a windsurfer, can locate some of those.
Last edited by ronnie on Mon Apr 26, 2021 2:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Sailrepair
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Re: Tide, rocks and weed.

Post by Sailrepair »

Don't use a proper buoy to mark the rocks use a empty 5 ltr plastic bottle/can so no one steals it.

Yes some spots here I get a rock warning by hitting the kelp first. It also makes a difference if you are on a very floaty board or not. On my JP 105 I can easily sink its tail 50cm when uphauling which especially if the board is sinking tail first can put my back wing down to 1.8m .

I did quite a bit of shallow water foiling out in Mauritius where I had to keep flying or would hit the coral. I wore polarised sunglasses to see the bottom and reef shoes -
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BTB
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Re: Tide, rocks and weed.

Post by BTB »

This is the reason I'm not sure i will ever get into foiling. The tides around North Wales / North west England are massive. 4 - 6m is the typical range. Add that to the slight slope of the beaches and you have a long walk to the water at low tide and you never really know the depth as the sand banks move about so much.
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Re: Tide, rocks and weed.

Post by ronnie »

Sailrepair wrote: Mon Apr 26, 2021 7:32 am Don't use a proper buoy to mark the rocks use a empty 5 ltr plastic bottle/can so no one steals it.

Yes some spots here I get a rock warning by hitting the kelp first. It also makes a difference if you are on a very floaty board or not. On my JP 105 I can easily sink its tail 50cm when uphauling which especially if the board is sinking tail first can put my back wing down to 1.8m .

I did quite a bit of shallow water foiling out in Mauritius where I had to keep flying or would hit the coral. I wore polarised sunglasses to see the bottom and reef shoes -
Good idea on the polarised glasses! I have found that I need to wear my contact lenses to both balance better on the foil and to see the depth of the water, but a week ago, the glare off the water meant I was hitting some weed while windsurfing.

I'll try a cheap float, but I find that even if it is just a floating rope with a looped end for kite launching, they cut the rope off.
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Re: Tide, rocks and weed.

Post by ronnie »

BTB wrote: Mon Apr 26, 2021 7:56 am This is the reason I'm not sure i will ever get into foiling. The tides around North Wales / North west England are massive. 4 - 6m is the typical range. Add that to the slight slope of the beaches and you have a long walk to the water at low tide and you never really know the depth as the sand banks move about so much.
Carrying windfoil gear can be quite a problem. I'm foiling strapless with some string handles on the deck. The gear can be heavy, cumbersome and out of balance for carrying - especially over stones and boulders to get to the water. I'm hoping to get a JP X-Foil Pro 5' 8" soon - which will be a lot easier to get to the water with a wing because of the handle on the underside (and hopefully with a sail too).

I've seen low tide in the NW of England and the edge of the water can be seemingly over the horizon when standing on the sand!
You need more marine lakes - like West Kirby.
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Re: Tide, rocks and weed.

Post by Sailrepair »

Yes, not everywhere suits foiling.

Also there is a big difference between carrying your kit over sand/grass and stones and rocks. carrying your kit over a soft surface you can risk the odd touch and clip of the ground. On hard ground its just not worth the risk.
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Re: Tide, rocks and weed.

Post by BTB »

ronnie wrote: Mon Apr 26, 2021 8:31 am Carrying windfoil gear can be quite a problem. I'm foiling strapless with some string handles on the deck. The gear can be heavy, cumbersome and out of balance for carrying - especially over stones and boulders to get to the water. I'm hoping to get a JP X-Foil Pro 5' 8" soon - which will be a lot easier to get to the water with a wing because of the handle on the underside (and hopefully with a sail too).

I've seen low tide in the NW of England and the edge of the water can be seemingly over the horizon when standing on the sand!
You need more marine lakes - like West Kirby.
This beach is 10mins from my house.

Image

You can see how far out the tide goes. Its very flat and the sand forms into bars that move around a fair amount. Catching the sand is an issue with a fin let alone a foil. a NW wind is off shore and the issue with windsurfing is that you have the fear of not being able to get back, a foil set up has one advantage over a fin in that i would imagine the massive mast would always track well upwind. But its a long walk to get solid 6ft depth of water.
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Re: Tide, rocks and weed.

Post by ronnie »

This is the sort of place I'm looking at.
halftides.JPG
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Re: Tide, rocks and weed.

Post by ronnie »

BTB wrote: Mon Apr 26, 2021 9:06 am
ronnie wrote: Mon Apr 26, 2021 8:31 am Carrying windfoil gear can be quite a problem. I'm foiling strapless with some string handles on the deck. The gear can be heavy, cumbersome and out of balance for carrying - especially over stones and boulders to get to the water. I'm hoping to get a JP X-Foil Pro 5' 8" soon - which will be a lot easier to get to the water with a wing because of the handle on the underside (and hopefully with a sail too).

I've seen low tide in the NW of England and the edge of the water can be seemingly over the horizon when standing on the sand!
You need more marine lakes - like West Kirby.
This beach is 10mins from my house.

Image

You can see how far out the tide goes. Its very flat and the sand forms into bars that move around a fair amount. Catching the sand is an issue with a fin let alone a foil. a NW wind is off shore and the issue with windsurfing is that you have the fear of not being able to get back, a foil set up has one advantage over a fin in that i would imagine the massive mast would always track well upwind. But its a long walk to get solid 6ft depth of water.
I have read wingfoilers saying that they go out in offshore winds and claim they can paddle back in if they have to.
I have one flat sandy location in an inlet that probably would be safe for an offshore wind, but what I would do is use the 40cm mast. In an offshore wind, the water is flat, so in theory, I could sail in water from 2' deep to 5' deep and walk back upwind if I had to - I could always sail to a shore at the side of the inlet even if I couldn't go upwind. So a flat shallow beach might work at some locations.

This is an example from one of our posters of using a 38cm mast foil in shallow water.


There seem to be quite a few videos of foiling in offshore winds from the South of France?
Last edited by ronnie on Mon Apr 26, 2021 10:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Tide, rocks and weed.

Post by Sailrepair »

I was out on Saturday in 100% offshore winds. It never enters my head not returning to where I came from. But I have to admit that is in the clyde where there is another side.

If anyone is new to foiling they have to remember it is the opposite of learning to windsurf in that trying to stay downwind can seem a problem if you are well powered.
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