Learning to waterstart

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Arf
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Re: Learning to waterstart

Post by Arf » Sun Jan 27, 2019 12:15 am

Jamesblonde wrote:
Fri Jan 25, 2019 9:05 pm
My wife has little interest in gybing and when she wants to turn around she will unhook, slow and then place the sail down wind, she then hops in quickly and then pulls the sail clear of the water. If it needs she will shove the tail of the board under the sail to lift the sail.
Yeah I still do that too sometimes - especially if it’s hell windy and there are cliffs downwind. I have trust issues with myself when it comes to gybing under duress.
The Fielding is probably the most kit-saving skill I have in the tank!

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Re: Learning to waterstart

Post by Distinctly Average » Sun Jan 27, 2019 3:00 am

Is this the confessional?

Forgive me Arf for I have sinned. It had been three months since my last Fielding!

ronnie
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Re: Learning to waterstart

Post by ronnie » Mon Jan 28, 2019 9:48 pm

Jasperthedog wrote:
Fri Jan 25, 2019 4:29 pm
Hi, everybody.

Next months mission is to learn how to water start, I've watched a stack of youtube vids now just
Need to get in the waterto see if I can bring it together.

I have seen these "waterstart" floats on ebay and wondered if they help speed up the learning process at all, or are they just a gimmick
that could introduce bad habits.

Thanks in advance,
Rich.
If you can - find an area of water that is waist to chest deep and practice waterstarting to stay in that area. You can practice getting the sail out of the water in the chest deep part - just don't touch the bottom.

For the actual waterstart, place your hands so that there is more force from the sail on your front hand. That puts more force on your front foot when in contact with the board and helps prevent it turning upwind as you come up onto the board. As you get better at it, you can move your hands to a more balanced pull, and use leaning toward the nose to prevent it turning up into the wind.

That is a key thing to be aware of - the twisting force of your feet on the board comes from the uneven force through your arms.
The other thing that makes the board turn is where the centre of pull of the sail is compared to the centre of sideways resistance of the board in the water. Thinking of those things helps understand what works/doesn't work, and why.

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Re: Learning to waterstart

Post by Lostboy » Tue Jan 29, 2019 9:02 am

Arf wrote:
Sun Jan 27, 2019 12:15 am
Jamesblonde wrote:
Fri Jan 25, 2019 9:05 pm
My wife has little interest in gybing and when she wants to turn around she will unhook, slow and then place the sail down wind, she then hops in quickly and then pulls the sail clear of the water. If it needs she will shove the tail of the board under the sail to lift the sail.
Yeah I still do that too sometimes - especially if it’s hell windy and there are cliffs downwind. I have trust issues with myself when it comes to gybing under duress.
The Fielding is probably the most kit-saving skill I have in the tank!
I'm struggling a bit with this concept. The number of processes you need to go through to waterstart is significantly more than making a gybe and the lack of control that you'd have with that process compared with a simple switch feet and flip sail makes it so much more sensible to just.....gybe! This is made even worse by having gone through part of a turn, let's call it a gybe shall we, and then chucking yourself in to start again. Bizarre.

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Re: Learning to waterstart

Post by Lostboy » Tue Jan 29, 2019 9:05 am

Back to the OT and the key thing to successful waterstarting - after flying the rig - is to point a lot further off the wind than you think you need to be. Most learner waterstarters (and a great many experienced ones!) try to waterstart too close to the wind. Make the first pull of the board with your back foot a substantial one to get the tail into the wind, the rig flying much better and to give you real drive as you sheet in.

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Re: Learning to waterstart

Post by billyboy » Tue Jan 29, 2019 1:29 pm

Plenty of good advice so far! I remember learning on a shallow shelving beach, starting with a beach start and then gradually getting deeper. I didn't do any other sailing that day at all - just spent a few hours only trying waterstarts - and could do it reasonably consistently by the end of the session...

As you progress you can/will start to think about the upcoming waterstart as you are falling in - with swift, appropriate action (e.g. hanging onto the boom for dear life, letting go with just the back hand, quickly flipping the sail or letting go completely depending on the nature of the crash) you can make getting into the waterstart position after the fall much easier and save a lot of energy.

Jasperthedog
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Re: Learning to waterstart

Post by Jasperthedog » Wed Jan 30, 2019 3:09 pm

Thanks again guys, Lots of info to go at.
Unfortunately got a bout of pluerisy at the moment so best put practice back a couple if weeks.
Cheers,
Rich.

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Re: Learning to waterstart

Post by PK1111 » Tue Apr 02, 2019 9:37 pm

Lots of good advice!

The key for me, is the water start is a dynamic move, and you can do in quite low winds.
Lift the rig up, nearing vertical in light winds, place back foot on the board, then really go for it - pull down on the arms, push up with the back leg and kick with your front leg.
Bear more away using front hand pressure in the water for more power.
In higher winds it’s more about controlling the power, so point more upwind and feather the sail.

I find medium sized gear is best, about 100 litres and 6m in typical 15 to 20 knots.

Good luck!

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Re: Learning to waterstart

Post by Richarli » Sat Apr 06, 2019 3:12 pm

It's also a lot easier if the tail of the board sinks as you go for the waterstart. Hence stay away from really floaty boards when you're learning.

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Re: Learning to waterstart

Post by Tomas » Thu May 30, 2019 10:20 pm

Jamesblonde wrote:
Fri Jan 25, 2019 9:01 pm
Tips.
Rig similar to the sailors your size that are planing about.

The action of actually getting lift is to extend your front arm, pulling in your back arm and tucking your head inwards under the boom as you rise.

If you were to sit on the floor with your feet flat on the floor close to your bum and then ask someone to pull you up, to do this with the least resistance and help from the other person you would tuck in close and try to lead with your head to get over your feet. Excess power at first will help cover any lack of technique
Agreed. I typically pull a bit on the back hand a few times to check how much power is available. If it’s plentyful you can do a lazy start. If marginal you need to wait for a gust before utilizing all available power in a kind of pump where you pull in on the back hand before letting the mast move as far and fast upright and forward as possible. By tucking in and extending the front arm you will allow the sail to gain enough forward momentum to pull you along. So help the rig get going first and it will return the favour by dragging you out of the water. If you’re the kind of sailor who tend to bend the front arm you will struggle. Heading a bit off the wind is always helpful as others have mentioned. Don’t practise on a huge board as it will keep you too far away from where you should get your feet.

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