New electric van

All vehicle related talk in here please.
Richarli
Posts: 183
Joined: Tue Nov 13, 2018 8:01 pm
Has liked: 10 times
Been liked: 34 times

New electric van

Post by Richarli »

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new- ... ectric-van

Now this could really be the next gen surf wagon!
Distinctly Average
Posts: 255
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2019 1:23 am
Has liked: 72 times
Been liked: 50 times

Re: New electric van

Post by Distinctly Average »

Looks cool. Saw some other electric vans at fully charged live earlier this year. The ID Bus looks superb for instance. I am looking forward the the EV revolution.
Smidge
Posts: 278
Joined: Mon Nov 19, 2018 8:44 pm
Location: Hayling, Avon, Poole or QM
Has liked: 78 times
Been liked: 78 times

Re: New electric van

Post by Smidge »

Me too. Have had a renault zoe for 5 years and we still absolutely love driving it (totally impractical for windsurfing though). Waiting desperately for something to be available that is big enough, with enough range/fast enough recharging and a price that makes sense (ie not much more than 10k more than equivalent diesel, as thats about what you save over its lifetime in fuel, service and maintenance etc costs).

Irritates me that most of focus has been on luxury SUVs - many of which you cant even fold seats down properly in (how can you have a luxury utility vehicle? Its as realistic as dehydrated water).
billyboy
Posts: 134
Joined: Mon Nov 12, 2018 1:05 pm
Has liked: 7 times
Been liked: 52 times

Re: New electric van

Post by billyboy »

I have a mitsubishi outlander PHEV. Whilst its a plug-in hybrid I hardly ever put petrol in it as my day to day motoring is almost always within the 30 mile range and I charge at home. Driving under electric power is sooooo much nicer - more responsive, quieter. It really irritates me when the engine kicks in! It's also a really good windsurfing car - easily taking 2 boards + 4 sails without collapsing the passenger seat...

I will be very keen to go full leccy for my next car in a couple of years time. If you can charge at home its definitely the way forward. Especially if you have a company car and don't do especially long trips (like me) as BIK is v. cheap (£0 from 2020 I think??)
Distinctly Average
Posts: 255
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2019 1:23 am
Has liked: 72 times
Been liked: 50 times

Re: New electric van

Post by Distinctly Average »

Sadly, some companies are struggling to take on the EV revolution while others have embraced it fully. Part of that is there is a lot of pressure on leasing companies from the automotive industry to help wind down the ICE manufacturing in an ordered manner. With all the embarrassment VW have accrued from their dodgy practices over the years they have taken on EV on a big scale and have stated there will be pricing parity probably by the end of 2020. Hopefully by then the infrastructure problems in the UK will be on the way to being fixed. I drove n E-Nero recently and it is a fantastic car but unlike driving a Tesla the built in sat nav struggled to find chargers mainly down to the disjointed charging network we have. Oh, and the nero fitted two boards and a good quiver of sails.
DavidA
Posts: 151
Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2018 9:59 pm
Location: Bigbury
Been liked: 25 times

Re: New electric van

Post by DavidA »

Not sure there should be an electric revolution when you take in to account the carbon footprint for manufacturing these things particularly when you consider the raw materials for batteries have to be mined. I read an article in New Scientist that calculated the carbon footprint for a Tesla 3 and an Audi A6 diesel over an average mileage of 10k a year for 3 years including the manufacture of the car and it was identical. Concluding that after 3 years the Tesla may need new batteries. The other issue for vans is where do you put the batteries when they have such a high heat output?
Distinctly Average
Posts: 255
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2019 1:23 am
Has liked: 72 times
Been liked: 50 times

Re: New electric van

Post by Distinctly Average »

The new battery myth after three years is just that. There are cases, and plenty of them of Prius doing well over 500k on original batteries, the same can be seen for most EVs. Sure, by then the rest of the car is falling apart but so would an ICE be. You also have to remember that when the batteries in EVs reach the end of their life for use in a car, they have very long term use in charging stations. What happens in the fast charge stations is there is a low level charge supplied to these batteries. When a car arrives and needs charging the load from those batteries is dumped into the car. Batteries use this way can be good for many years, up to 30 years at current predictions. This is also good for the national grid as they can borrow some of this charge in times of need. In fact if the same can be done for cars that are plugged into the grid, and the country adopts EV in a big way, we can actually reduce the number of powers stations we need. The overall load will be similar, but there will be a huge nationwide store of energy to tap into rather than firing up reserve stations at the end of strictly or some other crap. A few countries are already bringing this online.

Mining is an interesting one. Lithium is not an issue. Batteries use a very tiny amount and it can be recycled. There is no foreseeable shortage of that element. Cobalt on the other hand we do have plenty but it is often in places such as the sea bed for which we need to be very careful how we treat it. However, cobalt is likely to be replaced by other elements in the not too distant so that may not become an issue. What can be said though is that for this part there will be a lot less mining than we do for coal, gas or oil as these element last and are not just burnt in one hit Also, a huge percentage of the cobalt used in batteries can be recovered and re-used.

People are dying in huge numbers from particulates so something has to be done. The average ICE care has about 19% efficiency from fuel plant output to miles driven and that does not take into account the manufacture and transport the fuel as then the comparison would be hard to work out. From power station output to miles driven the average EV has a 69% efficiency. A big difference I am sure you will agree.
Smidge
Posts: 278
Joined: Mon Nov 19, 2018 8:44 pm
Location: Hayling, Avon, Poole or QM
Has liked: 78 times
Been liked: 78 times

Re: New electric van

Post by Smidge »

5yrs and 40k miles on my pure electric zoe and no noticeable battery depletion (and you would notice it as range is low - which is what you would expect for £12k 5 years ago...). New version has 2.5x. battery capacity in similar physical space.
billyboy
Posts: 134
Joined: Mon Nov 12, 2018 1:05 pm
Has liked: 7 times
Been liked: 52 times

Re: New electric van

Post by billyboy »

I've read of fleets of Teslas with 500k miles+ with very little battery degradation. An ICE would almost certainly not reach that mileage (the ICE is more complex and less reliable), but if it did its mpg would be far less than when new.

Maybe I am reading too much EV propaganda, but the health problems caused by particulate pollution from ICE are real - towns and cities are unpleasant as a result and as stated before many people are getting sick and dying because of it. For that reason alone EV's should be the future.
DavidA
Posts: 151
Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2018 9:59 pm
Location: Bigbury
Been liked: 25 times

Re: New electric van

Post by DavidA »

I agree an alternative to ICE is very much needed but I am not sure that EV manufacturers are going about this right way. There doesn't seem to be any standardisation with recharging infrastructure. Fast charging is still not that fast though I understand they have developed a method which is quick but requires the battery to heated up to 60c! Maybe fitting cars with a number of small batteries that you could just swap in and out at a station might be a way forward. It would have to be quite a high number to enable them to be manhandled.
Having just done a road trip round Ireland which involved first driving 250 miles to get a ferry it really couldn't have been done with an electric vehicle with the current state of recharging infrastructure.
I think we will be with hybrids for a long time to come which of course does cut down fuel particulates. I read an alarming piece by Boston Consulting Group saying that by 2030 85% of all passenger vehicles will have an ICE.
Post Reply