Electrickery & Hybrid vehicles suitable for windsurfing

All vehicle related talk in here please.
wully
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Re: Electrickery & Hybrid vehicles suitable for windsurfing

Post by wully » Mon Nov 26, 2018 6:39 pm

TwoFish wrote:
Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:31 pm
Max wrote:
Sat Nov 24, 2018 11:04 pm
and i am a RMT member
I think Max meant 'RYA' Wully ;-)
I prefer the RMT :mrgreen:

( bang goes my chance of a fishy Crimbo card..)

ps44
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Re: Electrickery & Hybrid vehicles suitable for windsurfing

Post by ps44 » Wed Nov 28, 2018 5:13 pm

Just seen this thread, and sorry to go back on topic....

Re grumpf's OP, I've had an Outlander PHEV for over two years and it works perfectly for our needs. All local driving is done on overnight charge, local sailing spot is within battery range with a few miles of petrol use, anything long distance is done on petrol. Last trip to Cornwall had two windsurf boards on the roof, and in the car: surfboard, two body boards, three masts, five sails, wetsuits and cases. MTB on the back and wife in the passenger seat. Sorted.

Distinctly Average
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Re: Electrickery & Hybrid vehicles suitable for windsurfing

Post by Distinctly Average » Mon Feb 11, 2019 7:12 pm

I had the opportunity recently to drive a full ev Kona and I must say it is excellent. Superb range of around 260 miles, £32k and will take a few boards, sails, masts etc with ease. If you have a drive or garage it makes loads of sense especially if you can get solar too. I think this is the game changer for electric cars. Finally one that will replace the average family car at a decent price and well built and specked too. I parked it at the office for 1hr and it was topped up nicely. Two of the three supermarkets near me have free chargers so I could leave one on while shopping and go home with more charge than when I left.

What irks me though, is that although my company is promoting EV one big problem remains. We all have fuel cards which cover the cost of fuel. However, there is currently no method of measuring electricity used to charge an EV to reimburse use. If the morons want us to have one then after two years of pushing EV down our throats they would have overcome this hurdle, somebody needs a slap in the happy sacks.

Until they sort that I will have to stick with my hybrid RAV4 girly car,

Smidge
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Re: Electrickery & Hybrid vehicles suitable for windsurfing

Post by Smidge » Tue Feb 12, 2019 5:24 pm

Does the Kona EV have a fold flat front seat? My wife just crashed our Renault Zoe and i was secretly hoping it would be a write off to give me an excuse to get a Kona EV (Zoe is brilliant - just not big enough for windsurfing and too short range, but was super cheap).

Distinctly Average
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Re: Electrickery & Hybrid vehicles suitable for windsurfing

Post by Distinctly Average » Tue Feb 12, 2019 5:37 pm

Not sure if it fold forwards. I folded it all the way backwards so should not be a problem.

Smidge
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Re: Electrickery & Hybrid vehicles suitable for windsurfing

Post by Smidge » Wed Feb 13, 2019 1:37 pm

I just updated my spreadsheet of costs and performance on our Renault Zoe, based on 4.5 years of ownership relative to what it would have cost to run an equivalent normal car. Bottom line is that if we do 10,000 miles a year then we would save £1250 a year on fuel (petrol versus overnight electricity from Green Energy's Tide tariff) and another £240 saving on combination of lower servicing costs (no oil changes, no air filter, not much brake use (regen braking)) and zero road tax. So close enough to £1500 per year of savings at 10,000 miles per year. 7 years, 70,000 miles and its £10.4k saved. That can justify the up front additional cost of a reasonably priced pure electric car like the Kona, provided you do a decent amount of miles in it. And the more miles you do the cheaper it is relatively.

Its more complicated in our case as we rent the battery for £54 per month and got the car cheap as a result, but the above should roughly hold for most. Bigger, heavier electric cars should be relatively even better than bigger, heavier normal cars as if you add 25% to electricity cost its still fairly negligible, whilst adding 25% to petrol or diesel use and its real money up in smoke....

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Re: Electrickery & Hybrid vehicles suitable for windsurfing

Post by Distinctly Average » Wed Feb 13, 2019 7:19 pm

Friend of mine has a barn converted to a garage for his cars and other toys. It is covered in solar panels and has a big battery bank in there. There is also a wind turbine on the roof. He uses his two electric, soon to be three then his Kia Niro arrives, at quite high mileage. He reckons in the last two years his rather large ott house has only used 5% of the electricity from the grid that he used before he got the renewables fitted. He says his cars are almost always taken out of the garage full. With his Tesla he can charge for free at superchargers but he only occasionally needs to do that. His leaf his wife often charges for free either at work or at the local supermarket.

Thing is, he is loaded. EV is great for those that have plenty of the green folding stuff and a home suitable. Those that live in a flat, those that don’t have a driveway and those who cannot afford the upfront cost are stuck with gas burners. Instead of taxing those who cannot go green off the road this government should be enabling everyone. Force all new builds to have solar. Force all new builds to install a charger on the drive if there is one. Force all developers to put chargers in all parking spots where flats are built. When councils upgrade their lighting to LED, also slap a charger in the lamp post. Finally, force all the private EV charging companies to allow billing to be done via one single system instead of the 19+ we have now. And force the to list their chargers on each other’s apps and maps.

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Re: Electrickery & Hybrid vehicles suitable for windsurfing

Post by Smidge » Thu Feb 14, 2019 1:38 pm

We have solar too, but i dont think solar is an important consideration in buying an electric car at all. If you charge your car on cheap overnight electricity (they have timers to make this happen simply) then the electricity cost is going to be fairly minor in the scheme of things -£250 a year - a small fraction of cost of solar panels. Also, your battery fast charger will likely draw at 7kW whilst your solar panels will be capped at 3.4kwh output for grid resilience reasons (in best conditions that only happen a few hours a day on a perfectly sunny day), and you obviously need to have it plugged in during the day when you are more likely to be at work or the beach. So without a truly massive solar array approved to allow output beyond the National Grid 3.4kw cap and usage that means you are plugged in during the day, solar isnt going to contribute a huge amount to what is in any event a fairly modest electricity cost.

If you do have solar then thats great, but I wouldnt link the 2 as a necessary interconnected decision. Solar works nicely with an economy7 type tariff or Green Energys Tide tariff as when electricity is expensive during the day you are more likely to be generating from solar, and when the sun isnt shining its cheaper.

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Re: Electrickery & Hybrid vehicles suitable for windsurfing

Post by Distinctly Average » Thu Feb 14, 2019 8:32 pm

Not quite the case. Solar can have a higher output but only that 3.4 can go to the grid.

Let’s just take a look at my friends setup. He has a battery bank connected to his solar. So during the day that gets charged, when he gets home that battery runs his home and tops up his cars. Most days he is doing around 50miles so it doesn’t take much topping up. His wife’s car takes even less as she charges it for free at work, at the shops etc. During the day his washing machine is running, water in his water tank is heated up etc. So solar in his case makes a lot of sense.

My point is, that for those who do not have a drive, or somewhere they can charge a car the costs will be higher. Work and supermarket chargers aside, on street private chargers or those at garages Etc charge a premium. The same people will in many cases have a higher use of fast chargers so will reduce the life of the batteries. For these reasons the government should IMO build the national infrastructure to enable everyone to enjoy the benefits without having to pay a premium. It can only benefit us all.

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